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Plenty of interest in Everton outcast

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Sandro Ramirez has a number of suitors, but is it for a loan or outright purchase?

Everton v Valencia - Pre-Season Friendly Photo by Chris Brunskill/Fantasista/Getty Images

With just one year left on his anchor of a contract, is this the summer Everton will finally sell Sandro Ramirez and get him off the books?

Ever since the Blues activated his £5 million release clause from Malaga in the 2017 summer of spending and handed him a £65,000 per week four-year contract, they’ve been struggling to get out of it. He has been unable to replicate his flash-in-the-pan 16-goal season again since then, in fact, he’s scored just five times in three whole seasons of being out on loan in the goal-flush La Liga, which is about all that needs to be said for how he’s done as a striker.

So after loan spells at Sevilla, Real Sociedad and Real Valladolid, Sandro appears ready to continue his own personal Vuelta a España next season with another set of Spanish clubs now interested in his services, but likely only for loan purposes. In fact, that might as well be modified to a tour of the Iberian peninsula with a couple of Portuguese sides thrown into the mix for good measure.

Spanish outlet Mundo Deportivo (via SportWitness) are reporting that SD Eibar, SD Huesca, Elche CF and Real Valladolid once again are all interested in the player, along with Braga and Sporting CP as well.

Apparently Carlo Ancelotti has also told the player that he would not feature for the Blues again even though he is scheduled to join up with the squad this week for preseason training.

Sandro remains a cautionary tale of signing players on the backs of a hot season or tournament, when the underlying metrics very clearly showed that he was quite out of his depth in the big leagues. Between the amortized value of his buyout clause and the wages for the upcoming year, the Blues can save nearly £5m if they are able to sell the player, so any additional transfer fees can actually turn this lost cause into a for-the-books-only profit.